VHDL projects in emacs

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by jerzy.gbur, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. jerzy.gbur

    jerzy.gbur Guest

    Hello,
    I'm FPGA designer, I work on Xilinx ISE tools (MS Windows XP).
    I've started to use emacs a week ago. It looks very impressive.

    But..
    1. How can I organize working with projects? I have some projects
    added to environment through putting their definition in .emacs file.
    It looks messy for me. How can I do other way? How you do that?

    2. Is there possibility to mark column region for copy/cut?

    Best Regards,

    Jerzy Gbur
     
    jerzy.gbur, Jul 2, 2008
    #1
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  2. There are 2 types of people in this world - those that can use emacs, and
    those that can't. It is decided at birth, and there's nothing you can do
    to change that! ;)

    (For the record, I can't use emacs) :(

    Regards,
     
    Mark McDougall, Jul 2, 2008
    #2
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  3. Good choice :) Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of emacs!
    Export the project (Vhdl..project..export) to the same folder as your
    HDL files. When you open an HDL file, VHDL-mode looks for a .prj file
    in the same folder. Alternatively, when you have a hierarchy of
    folders and you open a file further down, you can do
    Vhdl..Project..Import project (or prod C-c C-p C-m) and you can read a
    project file in.
    Yes, but it's a bit weird if you've used any "normal" editors :)

    Set the mark at one corner of the rectangle, set the cursor to the
    other corner and do M-x kill-rectangle. You can then do M-x
    yank-rectangle to put it somewhere else.

    However, I do very little of this, as my usual reason for hacking
    around rectangles of text was for instantiating components and
    creating signal lists from entity declarations, which VHDL-mode does
    very nicely for me with just a few key pressses ;)

    Cheers,
    Martin
     
    Martin Thompson, Jul 2, 2008
    #3
  4. jerzy.gbur

    jerzy.gbur Guest

    Ok, I will do experiments.
    Yeah, it works :)))

    Thank you,


    Best Regards,

    Jerzy Gbur
     
    jerzy.gbur, Jul 2, 2008
    #4
  5. a écrit :
    There are key bindings for these
    C-x r k for killing the rectangle
    C-x r y for yanking it
    C-x r t to replace the rectangle with text
    There are others but I never use them

    Nicolas
     
    Nicolas Matringe, Jul 2, 2008
    #5
  6. jerzy.gbur

    omara007

    Joined:
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    I have one question regarding the VHDL-mode .. I actually started with Verilog-Mode before I try the VHDL-mode .. and I still have the impression that Verilog-mode is more mature ..

    Anyhow, anyone knows what should be done to automatically update a top-level module with the changes made to the interface/ports of a lower-level module ? .. should I still copy the ports from the Lower-Level Module to the Upper-Level one ? .. or there is any smarter method to do that, like in Verilog-mode when you open the top-level module file it directly senses the changes of the lower module .. and it asks you if you want to update or not ..
     
    omara007, Jul 3, 2008
    #6
  7. jerzy.gbur

    Reuven Guest

    From Section 18.3 in the emacs user's guide.

    18.3 Saving Rectangles in Registers
    ===================================

    A register can contain a rectangle instead of linear text. The
    rectangle is represented as a list of strings. *Note Rectangles::,
    for
    basic information on how to specify a rectangle in the buffer.

    `C-x r r R'
    Copy the region-rectangle into register R
    (`copy-rectangle-to-register'). With numeric argument, delete it
    as well.

    `C-x r i R'
    Insert the rectangle stored in register R (if it contains a
    rectangle) (`insert-register').

    The `C-x r i R' command inserts a text string if the register
    contains one, and inserts a rectangle if the register contains one.

    See also the command `sort-columns', which you can think of as
    sorting a rectangle. *Note Sorting::.


    After practice, it's easier than initially perceived. :)

    regards,
    r
     
    Reuven, Jul 3, 2008
    #7
  8. jerzy.gbur

    jerzy.gbur Guest

    Hello,

    Thank all of you.
    All advices are very helpful.

    Every day, using emacs is easier then before :)

    Best Regards,

    Jerzy Gbur
     
    jerzy.gbur, Jul 4, 2008
    #8
  9. a écrit :

    And then one day you start looking into regular expressions, then lisp
    (well, elisp actually) ... :)

    Nicolas
     
    Nicolas Matringe, Jul 4, 2008
    #9
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