The devolution of English language and slothful c.l.p behaviors exposed!

R

Rick Johnson

Here is a grep from the month of September 2011 showing the rampantly
egregious misuse of the following words and phrases:

* pretty
* hard
* right
* used to
* supposed to

"Pretty" is the most ludicrous of them all! As you will see, "pretty"
is used superfluously, over and over again! In fact, you could safely
omit "pretty" without sacrificing any meaning of most all the
sentences that include the word "pretty". Likewise, in 99% of the
examples, the word "difficult" can be substituted for the word "hard"
without sacrificing any meaning. Same for "correct" and "right". Of
course, "used to" and "supposed to" will require people to rethink
there lazy and slothful ways.


------------------------------------------------------------
Found 43 unique occurances of " pretty " in a sentence:
------------------------------------------------------------

| I'm "PRETTY" sure, you problem comes from this.
|
| That's "PRETTY" good, too.
|
| I'm "PRETTY" sure it is because of my c background
| (actually i learned python before c, and thus learned %
| formatting in python).
|
| I think the problem many people ignore when coming up with
| solutions like this is that while this behaviour is
| "PRETTY" much unique for turkish script, there is no
| guarantee that turkish substrings won't appear in other
| language strings (or vice versa).
|
| Seems "PRETTY" logical to me.
|
| My concern about the multiprocessing module technique is
| that launching a process for every regex evaluation sounds
| "PRETTY" inefficient.
|
| Avoiding them is "PRETTY" easy here.
|
| Pretty easy to do though.
|
| For me, they're also "PRETTY" rare; many programs i write
| have no explicit continuations in them at all.
|
| 2011 05:42 schrieb atherun: i'm "PRETTY" sure thats the
| problem, this is a generic catch all function for running
| subprocesses.
|
| Comwrote: not saying one is necessarily better than the
| other, but just subscribing to the feed for the [python]
| tag on so has a "PRETTY" good snr.
|
| Com/photos/67254913 at n07/6123112552/in/photostream#/
| there are smarter ways to do this in matplotlib, but this
| is "PRETTY" quick and dirty.
|
| Basicconfig` "PRETTY" useless.
|
| Earlier, back in your initial post, you said: "i don't see
| any way to reduce these nested loops logically, they
| describe "PRETTY" well what the software has to do.
|
| Comhey, this "PRETTY" easy hack appears to work!
|
| Value yeah, that's "PRETTY" much what i had in mind.
|
| Do_b() # continue sounds a "PRETTY" natural way to allow
| free line breaking.
|
| If we start discussing the content of the ideas being
| attacked, yeah, i'd say religion is "PRETTY" off-topic.
|
| But it's "PRETTY" easy to fool a lot of people.
|
| Comwrote: i would expect that static variables would work
| "PRETTY" much the same way as default arguments could you
| just abuse default arguments to accomplish this?
|
| The product works "PRETTY" much like excel and calc in
| this manner.
|
| It's "PRETTY" much the dictum of coding style and referred
| to alot by many pythoneers.
|
| Although come to think of it, i bet he could deliver a
| "PRETTY" mean sermon.
|
| Not saying one is necessarily better than the other, but
| just subscribing to the feed for the [python] tag on so
| has a "PRETTY" good snr.
|
| Com/photos/67254913 at n07/6123112552/in/photostream#/
| there are fancier ways to do this in matplotlib, but this
| is "PRETTY" quick and dirty--i'm just plotting lines over-
| top other lines.
|
| Com/recipes/577334-how-to-debug-deadlocked-multi-threaded-
| programs/ there is some bugs in the code given but its
| "PRETTY" straight forward to fix it.
|
| Sorry for that it's "PRETTY" unimportant question
| according to the other questions being asked here :d def
| trial(): class foo(object): def __init__(self):
| print("hello, world!
|
| I would expect that static variables would work "PRETTY"
| much the same way as default arguments, with a list of
| names on the code object and a list of values on the
| function object.
|
| ), so maybe the proposal has a little weight there, but
| since you can just avoid that by using parens, that's
| "PRETTY" much nullified.
|
| __subclasses__()) return subcls(*args, **kwds) to me, this
| reads "PRETTY" cleanly and makes it obvious that something
| unusual is going on: obj = mybaseclass.
|
| Comabout the only keyword i can think of this being even
| slightly useful for would be class and even then i think
| that clazz is a "PRETTY" acceptable substitute.
|
| 0 might be a "PRETTY" be rewrite.
|
| Com/ignore-files/ ] * otherwise, the code looks "PRETTY"
| good for a beginner.
|
| Com i'm "PRETTY" sure thats the problem, this is a generic
| catch all function for running subprocesses.
|
| Seeing the quotes again, i'm "PRETTY" sure i was intending
| to be flippant _in reference to rantrantrantrick's
| comment_.
|
| Stop() gives a "PRETTY" damn good explanation as to why
| thread.
|
| Personally, i find that to be "PRETTY" bizarre -- but it
| worked.
|
| Id) [/script] it's a "PRETTY" common gotcha for people
| coming from other languages.
|
| Ar this is a "PRETTY" optimistic algorithm, at least by
| the statistics from 2008 (see below).
|
| I don't see any way to reduce these nested loops
| logically, they describe "PRETTY" well what the software
| has to do.
|
| Bottle is "PRETTY" minimal (iirc it doesn't even come with
| any templating).
|
| Pretty immaterial, but the formal style prefers
| correctness.
|
| Pretty much all of the magic happens behind cryptic sas
| calls like this.

------------------------------------------------------------
Found 37 unique occurances of " hard " in a sentence:
------------------------------------------------------------

| Would it have been so "HARD" to show a couple of examples?
|
| Some general guidelines may be provided, but there is no
| need for other "HARD" rules on breaking lines, except that
| an identifier should never be split apart.
|
| If you're dividing a project into multiple files already,
| is it that "HARD" to have one more that defines the
| relationships between the others?
|
| I find it "HARD" to understand how anyone can read this
| text: this is implemented by calling the standard c
| function system(), and has the same limitations and not
| imagine it to be dependent on the specification for
| system().
|
| Org/dev/peps/pep-0257/ ): this is "HARD" to read due to
| the indentation, and cannot be accessed programmatically:
| #update the gui def update_gui(self, new_word): instead,
| use this: def update_gui(self, new_word): "update the gui.
|
| It is not "HARD" to do.
|
| Re "HARD" at work to bring you the best conference yet, so
| stay tuned to pycon news at http://pycon.
|
| Orgon 9/5/2011 4:38 pm, jon redgrave wrote: it seems
| unreasonably "HARD" to write simple one-line unix command
| line filters in python: eg: ls | python -c
| "<somethingprint x.
|
| Comjon redgrave wrote: it seems unreasonably "HARD" to
| write simple one-line unix command line filters in python:
| eg: ls | python -c "<somethingprint x.
|
| 2 on win 7) quite successfully, it is "HARD" to know what
| the problem is with your setup.
|
| I've tried very "HARD" to get this to work, but as i've
| been unsuccessful i would really appreciate some comments
| on this.
|
| Deon 05/09/11 22:38, jon redgrave wrote: it seems
| unreasonably "HARD" to write simple one-line unix command
| line filters in python: eg: ls | python -c
| "<somethingprint x.
|
| 1k (and only in "HARD" copy) - this was a good 5/6 years
| ago though.
|
| See my response on this thread or my new thread idioms
| combining 'next(items)' and 'for item in items:' i
| reckoned the approach with the flag the most beginner-
| friendly because you don't have to think too "HARD" about
| the corner-cases, namely book_title("") '' when i use the
| "process first item before the loop" approach i usually
| end up with a helper generator def _words(words,
| small_words={w.
|
| It probably shows that i haven't done a lot of thread-
| related programming, so perhaps this is not a "HARD"
| question.
|
| It'd not be "HARD" to design a template that covers comp.
|
| (did anyone ever mention that timezones are "HARD" ;-) )
| it feels more intuitive now, but it is backwards
| incompatible in the case where the `tzinfo` parameter to
| the `test_datetime` constructor was used.
|
| Threads are a lot more lightweight and start up a lot
| faster, but doing multithreaded programming right with any
| sort of shared objects is really, really, really "HARD" to
| get right.
|
| (but note that not all file systems support "HARD"
| linking.
|
| But as you can see, they quickly become "HARD" to read:
| [j+2 for i in [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]] for j in (lambda
| x: [q+10 for q in x])(i)] their main advantage isn't in
| list comps, where you can already use arbitrary
| expressions, but in calls that require a function as an
| argument.
|
| Comwhen it comes to the air force 1 {1}{/1}a lot of you
| might imagine that it would be quite "HARD" to continue
| improving and innovating on the design of it, but leave it
| to nike to surprise you at just about every turn.
|
| Py <--------+ this is not a copy, it is a "HARD" link: the
| same file appears in literally two places.
|
| From pylab import * x = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] y = [2 for num
| in x] #plot the parallel lines themselves in green for num
| in range(6): y = [num for item in x]
| plot(x,y,color='g',lw='4') #plot any conflict sections in
| red or yellow #some "HARD" data to give the idea: x2 =
| [3,4] y2 = [2 for num in x2] x3 = [5,6,7] y3 = [4 for num
| in x3] x4 = [2,3] y4 = [3 for num in x4] #plot these three
| colored parts over the green lines
| plot(x2,y2,color='r',lw='12')
| plot(x3,y3,color='yellow',lw='12')
| plot(x4,y4,color='r',lw='12') pos = arange(6) yticks(pos,
| ('net1', 'net2', 'net3', 'net4', 'net5', 'net6')) show()
| #------------------------- che from mdickinson at
| enthought.
|
| But that makes it "HARD" for those of us who want to use a
| built-in option-parsing library across a wide variety of
| python versions.
|
| Cnwrote: when it comes to the air force 1 {1}{/1}a lot of
| you might imagine that it would be quite "HARD" to
| continue improving and innovating on the design of it, but
| leave it to nike to surprise you at just about every turn.
|
| Orgjon redgrave wrote: it seems unreasonably "HARD" to
| write simple one-line unix command line filters in python:
| eg: ls | python -c "<somethingprint x.
|
| Another hack would be to add a "HARD" link to the top
| level: as you said: "HARD" links would be a little
| annoying on some file systems.
|
| :) in this case it doesn't matter, but it's not "HARD" to
| find problems where the difference between the memory
| requirements for a generator and a map/list-comprehension
| are significant enough to worry about.
|
| Given how "HARD" it is to find an appropriate sitemap
| generator written in python, i'd say there is a strong
| likelihood that one that meets your needs and is publicly
| available under an appropriate licence is vanishingly
| small.
|
| Comit seems unreasonably "HARD" to write simple one-line
| unix command line filters in python: eg: ls | python -c
| "<somethingprint x.
|
| (it is a little "HARD" to google for this given the map()
| function).
|
| Comwrites: it seems unreasonably "HARD" to write simple
| one-line unix command line filters in python: eg: ls |
| python -c "<somethingprint x.
|
| Another hack would be to add a "HARD" link to the top
| level: modules/ +-- spam.
|
| Com/cs/ it's "HARD" to believe that something as rational
| as the metric system was invented by the french.
|
| It's not that "HARD" to hold a socket connection open!
|
| Comwrote: rick & xang li are two examples of what you
| *don't* see (or at least i don't) @ so then you haven't
| been looking "HARD" enough ;-) -- rhodri james *-*
| wildebeest herder to the masses from steve+comp.
|
| In other words, linux will try really, really, really
| "HARD" to give you the 84 gigabytes you've asked for on a
| 2 gb system, even if it means dosing your system for a
| month.

------------------------------------------------------------
Found 55 unique occurances of " right " in a sentence:
------------------------------------------------------------

| The advantage of lambdas is that, in a list comprehension
| or map call, the code is "RIGHT" there instead of being
| elsewhere in a def statement.
|
| Poll() not in [0,1]: waiting = true so my real question
| is: am i on the "RIGHT" track here, and am i correct in my
| guess that the kernel is reporting different status codes
| to subprocess.
|
| You can just use normal python method calls, with almost
| every possible parameter and return value type, and pyro
| takes care of locating the "RIGHT" object on the "RIGHT"
| computer to execute the method.
|
| _test() -- terry jan reedy thank you terry, i went for
| this solution as it was the easiest for me to understand
| and comment myself keeping in mind what level i am at
| "RIGHT" now.
|
| Getting the code "RIGHT" is going to be a lot more
| complicated than just adding a couple of try/excepts.
|
| ) "RIGHT" tool for the job!
|
| I read "RIGHT" past that and didn't see it.
|
| That's not to say that one is "RIGHT" and the other is
| wrong.
|
| Incidentally - this isn't really about commutativity at
| all - the question is how can you define both left and
| "RIGHT" versions of add, irrespective of whether they
| yield the same result.
|
| If i neither disable buffering nor manually flush after
| each print, the program just hangs instead of printing
| "RIGHT" away.
|
| Having the "RIGHT" vocabulary helps.
|
| Log(out) i haven't tested that, but i think (from reading
| the docs) that's the "RIGHT" idea.
|
| 36 is out: openopt: now solver interalg can handle all
| types of constraints and integration problems some minor
| improvements and code cleanup funcdesigner: interval
| analysis now can involve min, max and 1-d monotone splines
| r -r of 1st and 3rd order some bugfixes and improvements
| spacefuncs: some minor changes derapproximator: some
| improvements for obtaining derivatives in points from r^n
| where left or "RIGHT" derivative for a variable is absent,
| especially for stencil 1 see http://openopt.
|
| Am i looking in the "RIGHT" place or did they just not get
| installed?
|
| __getattribute__(name) "RIGHT" thanks a lot it works
| perfectly.
|
| Waiting = true so my real question is: am i on the "RIGHT"
| track here, and am i correct in my guess that the kernel
| is reporting different status codes to subprocess.
|
| I just resolved it and yes you are "RIGHT" there was a
| (hidden) new-line to it.
|
| If you require a 1:1 correspondence between your code and
| your pseudo-code specification, then maybe python isn't
| the "RIGHT" language for this task.
|
| If you want to interpret it as meaning that cats are
| yamlafiables, go "RIGHT" ahead.
|
| Orgon 9/11/2011 7:46 am, tigerstyle wrote: thank you
| terry, i went for this solution as it was the easiest for
| me to understand and comment myself keeping in mind what
| level i am at "RIGHT" now.
|
| Check out the art we're digging "RIGHT" now and what's on
| our gotta-hang-it list.
|
| Py of the django application exports some all rpc
| functions which will basically import 95% of the django
| application and the entire django frame work (none of
| which were required by my command tool, support utility
| for this application) i could of course create a separate
| package just for this tiny sub module, but somehow it
| doesn't feel "RIGHT" to me.
|
| If you really fear rogue, or malicious, scripts, perhaps
| python is not the "RIGHT" language for this task.
|
| My reason for wanting to do it 'in the same script' was
| that i also have another library that intercepts calls to
| matplotlib's show(), so i could ultimately create a pdf
| containing the script with figures interjected at the
| "RIGHT" place.
|
| "you are right" and i am right, and you are right, and all
| is "RIGHT" as "RIGHT" can be!
|
| This time, on the upper "RIGHT" corner of the rejection
| page, i saw the following message: "your registration
| violated our anti-spam filter.
|
| If | i neither disable buffering nor manually flush after
| each print, the | program just hangs instead of printing
| "RIGHT" away.
|
| I play a lot of flash games, and "RIGHT" now i'm playing
| one that has coped poorly with a miniature slashdotting.
|
| Threads are a lot more lightweight and start up a lot
| faster, but doing multithreaded programming "RIGHT" with
| any sort of shared objects is really, really, really hard
| to get right.
|
| The map() function is very similar to a generator
| expression, but it can iterate over multiple iterables at
| once: list(map(lambda x,y: x+y,[1,2,3],[40,50,60])) [41,
| 52, 63] note how the lambda keeps the code "RIGHT" there,
| whereas a def would separate it out.
|
| Yellow) # the "RIGHT" window line((x + 60, y + 71),
| (x + 80, y + 71), color=color.
|
| Git is not the "RIGHT" forma t; it must have #egg=package
| on wed, sep 14, 2011 at 10:54 pm, one murithi <o0murithi
| at gmail.
|
| It is like the fortran example (just to show the syntax,
| has an infinite loop), everyone can understand that
| "RIGHT" away, even non fortran people: 10 loop1: do i=1,3
| loop2: do j=1,4 print *,i,j goto 10 !
|
| Now when i scroll the window grows and shrinks depending
| on their size, i want to "RIGHT" from the start make it
| high enough to contain even the biggest that will have to
| be shown.
|
| If you have an application where the quality of randomness
| is unimportant and generating random ints is a genuine
| performance bottleneck, then go "RIGHT" ahead.
|
| I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which,
| | `\ when you looked at it in the "RIGHT" way, did
| not become still | _o__)
| more complicated.
|
| I am in search for a set of libraries, which allows me to:
| - verify the server certificate (ideally via a custom call
| back, which can inspect the certificate data and then
| decide whether the certificate shall be accepted or not) -
| send a client certificate - use https with a cookie jar
| (ideally even persistent, but session cookies are enough)
| - do xmlrpc calls (but send cookies in the headers) would
| m2crypto be the "RIGHT" choice?
|
| Py i've found, that the temporary module created inside
| the run_path() calls, is destroyed "RIGHT" after the
| script.
|
| But do realise that it is _you_ who is interpreting it as
| such, and then recall the provision your very own christ
| stated about judging the actions of others: within your
| own belief system _it's not your "RIGHT" to do so_.
|
| Otherwise you could do entirely without gotos (like in
| ruby with the redo, which is of course much much better)
| to take the most obvious, simple example: any time you
| have a loop that you might want to redo, the "RIGHT"
| solution is to put the loop inside a function, and then
| "redo the loop" becomes "call the function again".
|
| It only is written at the left of the dot rather than at
| the "RIGHT" of the parenthesis.
|
| To take the most obvious, simple example: any time you
| have a loop that you might want to redo, the "RIGHT"
| solution is to put the loop inside a function, and then
| "redo the loop" becomes "call the function again".
|
| Personally, i consider two nested loops "RIGHT" on the
| boundary of my "magic number seven, plus or minus two"
| short term memory[1].
|
| There is no issue when i load it "RIGHT" from the folder
| where the python executable and libpython2.
|
| T "RIGHT" outer join public.
|
| Is the "RIGHT" interpretation of this timing difference
| that the comprehension is performed in the lower level c
| code?
|
| As far as i can see, all of the code is "RIGHT" but i'm
| just a beginner so i am not for sure.
|
| Are you testing the "RIGHT" code?
|
| Do down in the "RIGHT" hand side-bar, there should be a
| menu 'essential links' and one of the options is 'download
| code' or something along those lines.
|
| You always call break and continue with a label, searching
| for that label will tell you "RIGHT" away which loop the
| break breaks.
|
| But, you're "RIGHT" that on most modern, non-embedded,
| linux systems threads don't show up in top or ps.
|
| Of course they are, and they are "RIGHT" to do so.
|
| Config docs, so am i "RIGHT" to assume {-style formatting
| is not implemented in logging.
|
| You're "RIGHT" though, os.
|
| I have to explicitly call the _init_ method which, i think
| is not the "RIGHT" way of doing things.

------------------------------------------------------------
Found 29 unique occurances of " used to " in a sentence:
------------------------------------------------------------

| I'm not sure of its current licensing status but i believe
| it "USED TO" be free if used on open source projects.
|
| Wing ide can be "USED TO" develop python code for web,
| gui, and embedded scripting applications.
|
| Shutil is a utility module "USED TO" accomplish tasks
| which one often does when in the shell, such as copying,
| moving, or removing directory trees.
|
| Uki'm not really very "USED TO" the decimal module so i'm
| asking here if any one can help me with a problem in a
| well known third party web framework the code in question
| is def format_number(value, max_digits, decimal_places):
| """ formats a number into a string with the requisite
| number of digits and decimal places.
|
| Comwrote: calling the bible a joke is "USED TO" hurt
| people, not enlighten them.
|
| :) ) you can't tell just from the syntax "USED TO" call
| them: function(arg) bound_method(arg)
| builtin_function_or_method(arg) callable_instance(arg)
| type(arg) all use the same syntax.
|
| I "USED TO" run an automated site validator, and i wrote a
| couple of articles you might find interesting.
|
| Comwrote: i'm not really very "USED TO" the decimal module
| so i'm asking here if any one can help me with a problem
| in a well known third party web framework the code in
| question is def format_number(value, max_digits,
| decimal_places): ?
|
| Sheets are "USED TO" remind the importance of the
| defensive players wore light clothing fencers irony.
|
| Comwrote: i "USED TO" ask the same question, but then i
| decided that if i wanted each data point to get its own
| tick, i should bite the bullet and write an individual
| test for each.
|
| Since thread stacks disappear at end of thread, only
| dynamically allocated memory can be "USED TO" store the
| result.
|
| On text file objects, read(nb) reads nb characters,
| regardless of the number of bytes "USED TO" encode them,
| and tell() returns a position in the text stream just
| after the next (unicode) character read as for sringio, a
| wrapper around file objects simulates a correct behaviour
| for relative seeks : ==================== txt = "abcdef"
| txt += "?
|
| I "USED TO" ask the same question, but then i decided that
| if i wanted each data point to get its own tick, i should
| bite the bullet and write an individual test for each.
|
| ] calling the bible a joke is "USED TO" hurt people, not
| enlighten them.
|
| Comwrites: calling the bible a joke is "USED TO" hurt
| people, not enlighten them.
|
| Perhaps a little more depressingly, this also maybe be
| "USED TO" highlight potential cases of poor productivity
| to be investigated.
|
| It "USED TO" have.
|
| Comi "USED TO" ask the same question, but then i decided
| that if i wanted each data point to get its own tick, i
| should bite the bullet and write an individual test for
| each.
|
| Py checkout usage: checkout url checkout: error: too few
| arguments plac can also be "USED TO" write command
| interpreters.
|
| Html i'm not "USED TO" big ide/rad for python.
|
| __init__() "USED TO" accept and silently ignore any
| parameters.
|
| Infowrites: i "USED TO" ask the same question, but then i
| decided that if i wanted each data point to get its own
| tick, i should bite the bullet and write an individual
| test for each.
|
| For the sake of completeness here's the script i "USED TO"
| produce the example above: $ cat pyfilter.
|
| That name is "USED TO" read a file with meta-data.
|
| I want a program that can be "USED TO" open any database
| and 'data mine' and extract table content.
|
| Also, it can be "USED TO" demonstrate a working program.
|
| Activepython also includes a binary package manager for
| python (pypm) that can be "USED TO" install packages much
| easily.
|
| Calling the bible a joke is "USED TO" hurt people, not
| enlighten them.
|
| If your colleague is "USED TO" program inside word macros,
| i guess the answer ;) if he is "USED TO" program in c, i'm
| less sure.

------------------------------------------------------------
Found 18 unique occurances of " supposed to " in a sentence:
------------------------------------------------------------

| Feldman wrote: it is "SUPPOSED TO" be possible to generate
| a list representation of any iterator that produces a
| sequence of finite length, but this doesn't always work.
|
| Fokke is the path "SUPPOSED TO" be absolute?
|
| I'd like to know what "string replacement" is "SUPPOSED
| TO" mean in the context of python.
|
| Isdir(path_name) nameerror: name 'path_name' is not
| defined -------------------------------------------
| "path_name" is a placeholder -- you're "SUPPOSED TO" put
| in the exact string(s) you have been trying in the
| configuration file (wrap the string in quotes).
|
| The python code is "SUPPOSED TO" call a few functions i
| exported.
|
| Ulimit -v is "SUPPOSED TO" set the maximum amount of
| virtual memory the process can use.
|
| Comit is "SUPPOSED TO" be possible to generate a list
| representation of any iterator that produces a sequence of
| finite length, but this doesn't always work.
|
| Could you tell me if that is what is "SUPPOSED TO" happen
| or is something wrong with my code?
|
| I'm not sure if this is how you're "SUPPOSED TO" do it,
| but it works.
|
| Infowrote: the intrinsic coding of the characters is one
| thing, the usage of bytes stream "SUPPOSED TO" represent a
| text is one another thing, jmf from sillyousu at gmail.
|
| 7 is "SUPPOSED TO" be the last 2.
|
| Before asking whether it is a bug, perhaps you should
| consider what (if anything) that regex is "SUPPOSED TO"
| actually do.
|
| Rename (ie, "on windows, if dst already exists, oserror
| will be raised") hmm, i thought, maybe i'm "SUPPOSED TO"
| use shutil here.
|
| Py, my code won't work, saying that the thing that is
| "SUPPOSED TO" be in path, isn't.
|
| Threads are never "SUPPOSED TO" be separate processes
| (they aren't at the c-level, so i don't know what java is
| doing here).
|
| Vi it is "SUPPOSED TO" send a string back to python, but
| sometimes it ends with an error saying the port and the ip
| is already in usage.
|
| Eduwrote: i'd like to know what "string replacement" is
| "SUPPOSED TO" mean in the context of python.
|
| Fout = open(outfile,"w+") what is the "+" "SUPPOSED TO"
| do?
 
E

Evan Driscoll

Of
course, "used to" and "supposed to" will require people to rethink
there lazy and slothful ways.
I'll go repent in the corner, over their.


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=IGQQ
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S

Steven D'Aprano

Here is a grep from the month of September 2011 showing the rampantly
egregious misuse of the following words and phrases:

* pretty
* hard
* right
* used to
* supposed to

I'm pretty sure that this news group is supposed to be for discussing the
Python programming language. At least it used to be about Python. It is
hard to understand why you think discussing English idioms is the right
thing to do here.
 
C

Chris Angelico

Here is a grep from the month of September 2011...

Is it? Interesting. I met that month yesterday (she was shopping in
Oakleigh, don't ask) and she knew nothing about it.

Oh, did you mean "Here is the result of using the grep(1) utility on
the python-list archive from the month of September 2011"?

Strange how we all knew what you meant, despite your slightly sloppy
use of language. I wonder if the same applies to the posts you cite.
| Wing ide can be "USED TO" develop python code for web,
| gui, and embedded scripting applications.

Come to think of it, what's your point? That this is incorrect usage?
Or that the proximity of the words "used" and "two" must be kept to a
minimum of three? According, of course, to the ancient laws of the
Greeks and Lats (they're people who spoke Latin, of course - the more
of them you have, the greater your latitude).

All in favour, say "Aye" in Latin. All against, say "Plonk".

ChrisA
who's probably in quite a few killfiles - possibly even killfiles as
they pertain to Operations...
 
A

Andrew Berg

You're right, but it's pretty hard for some people to do what they're
supposed to when it isn't what they're used to.
 
A

alex23

On 1/23/2012 23:57, Rick Johnson wrote:> Of

I'll go repent in the corner, over their.

You forget, Rick's errors are genuine mistakes that only a pedant
would focus on, while everyone else's are egregious and outrageous
violations of one fundamental law or another.

Still: _bwahahahahaha_
 
I

Ian Kelly

Here is a grep

A grep? What is a grep? That word is not in any of my dictionaries.
Are you perhaps carelessly invoking the neologism of referring to an
execution of the "grep" UNIX program as "a grep"?
from the month of September 2011 showing the rampantly
egregious misuse of the following words and phrases:

How can anything be "rampantly egregious"? Do you instead mean
"rampant, egregious misuse"?
"Pretty" is the most ludicrous of them all! As you will see, "pretty"
is used superfluously, over and over again!

Over what and over what again? Idioms such as this are the mark of a
lazy speaker; they can be confusing to non-native speakers and are
best avoided.
In fact, you could safely
omit "pretty" without sacrificing any meaning of most all the
sentences that include the word "pretty".

Then it is rather like the word "all" in the sentence quoted above,
although unlike that usage, the usages of the word "pretty" that you
cite are at least grammatically correct.
Likewise, in 99% of the
examples, the word "difficult" can be substituted for the word "hard"
without sacrificing any meaning.

That is because "difficult" and "hard" are synonyms. Similarly, you
could have used the word "similarly" in the above sentence instead of
"likewise" without sacrificing any meaning.
Same for "correct" and "right". Of
course, "used to" and "supposed to" will require people to rethink
there lazy and slothful ways.

I'm sorry. Where will it require people to rethink lazy and slothful
ways? The pronoun "there" in your sentence seems to lack an
antecedent.

"Occurances"? The fact that you are complaining about the word usage
of others but cannot even be bothered to run a spell-check on your own
message speaks volumes.
 
C

Chris Angelico

A grep?  What is a grep?

According to the damage type table on Aardwolf MUD, a grep is a type
of slash - at least, it's resisted by the same armor value that
resists slashing damage. I had to ask about it on-game, being rather
surprised that grep could deal 300 points of damage to my foe.

Stand back, I know regular expressions!

ChrisA
 
J

Jérôme

Mon, 23 Jan 2012 21:57:16 -0800 (PST)
Rick Johnson a écrit:
"Pretty" is the most ludicrous of them all! As you will see, "pretty"
is used superfluously, over and over again! In fact, you could safely omit
"pretty" without sacrificing any meaning of most all the sentences that
include the word "pretty".

And so... ?
Likewise, in 99% of the examples, the word "difficult" can be substituted
for the word "hard" without sacrificing any meaning.

I seriously doubt that. Did you even read the output of your grep of was that
an automatic e-mail ?
Same for "correct" and "right".

Well... no.

Again, read your own grep before posting it. In fact, don't post it at all.
Of course, "used to" and "supposed to" will require people to rethink there
lazy and slothful ways.

I don't even see the problem with those...

As someone already said, english is a foreign language to a lot of us. While
we're doing our best to make ourselves understood, your attitude can be seen
as quite rude. (Does "quite" fit right as a "pretty" replacement ?)

Or merely, it could. If it wasn't just ridiculous.

Now for the fun part, try to apply the substitutions you suggested on your
own grep. It is so full of false-positives it does a good job proving you
wrong.

------------------------------------------------------------
Found 37 unique occurances of " hard " in a sentence:
------------------------------------------------------------

| Some general guidelines may be provided, but there is no
| need for other "HARD" rules on breaking lines, except that
| an identifier should never be split apart.
|
| 1k (and only in "HARD" copy) - this was a good 5/6 years
| ago though.
|
| (but note that not all file systems support "HARD"
| linking.
|
| Py <--------+ this is not a copy, it is a "HARD" link: the
| same file appears in literally two places.
|
| From pylab import * x = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] y = [2 for num
| in x] #plot the parallel lines themselves in green for num
| in range(6): y = [num for item in x]
| plot(x,y,color='g',lw='4') #plot any conflict sections in
| red or yellow #some "HARD" data to give the idea: x2 =
| [3,4] y2 = [2 for num in x2] x3 = [5,6,7] y3 = [4 for num
| in x3] x4 = [2,3] y4 = [3 for num in x4] #plot these three
| colored parts over the green lines
| plot(x2,y2,color='r',lw='12')
| plot(x3,y3,color='yellow',lw='12')
| plot(x4,y4,color='r',lw='12') pos = arange(6) yticks(pos,
| ('net1', 'net2', 'net3', 'net4', 'net5', 'net6')) show()
| #------------------------- che from mdickinson at
| enthought.
|
| Another hack would be to add a "HARD" link to the top
| level: as you said: "HARD" links would be a little
| annoying on some file systems.
|
| Another hack would be to add a "HARD" link to the top
| level: modules/ +-- spam.
|
------------------------------------------------------------
Found 55 unique occurances of " right " in a sentence:
------------------------------------------------------------

| The advantage of lambdas is that, in a list comprehension
| or map call, the code is "RIGHT" there instead of being
| elsewhere in a def statement.
|
| Poll() not in [0,1]: waiting = true so my real question
| is: am i on the "RIGHT" track here, and am i correct in my
| guess that the kernel is reporting different status codes
| to subprocess.
|
| You can just use normal python method calls, with almost
| every possible parameter and return value type, and pyro
| takes care of locating the "RIGHT" object on the "RIGHT"
| computer to execute the method.
|
| _test() -- terry jan reedy thank you terry, i went for
| this solution as it was the easiest for me to understand
| and comment myself keeping in mind what level i am at
| "RIGHT" now.
|
| Getting the code "RIGHT" is going to be a lot more
| complicated than just adding a couple of try/excepts.
|
| ) "RIGHT" tool for the job!
|
| I read "RIGHT" past that and didn't see it.
|
| That's not to say that one is "RIGHT" and the other is
| wrong.
|
| Incidentally - this isn't really about commutativity at
| all - the question is how can you define both left and
| "RIGHT" versions of add, irrespective of whether they
| yield the same result.
|
| If i neither disable buffering nor manually flush after
| each print, the program just hangs instead of printing
| "RIGHT" away.
|
| Having the "RIGHT" vocabulary helps.
|
| Log(out) i haven't tested that, but i think (from reading
| the docs) that's the "RIGHT" idea.
|
| 36 is out: openopt: now solver interalg can handle all
| types of constraints and integration problems some minor
| improvements and code cleanup funcdesigner: interval
| analysis now can involve min, max and 1-d monotone splines
| r -r of 1st and 3rd order some bugfixes and improvements
| spacefuncs: some minor changes derapproximator: some
| improvements for obtaining derivatives in points from r^n
| where left or "RIGHT" derivative for a variable is absent,
| especially for stencil 1 see http://openopt.
|
| Am i looking in the "RIGHT" place or did they just not get
| installed?
|
| __getattribute__(name) "RIGHT" thanks a lot it works
| perfectly.
|
| Waiting = true so my real question is: am i on the "RIGHT"
| track here, and am i correct in my guess that the kernel
| is reporting different status codes to subprocess.
|
| I just resolved it and yes you are "RIGHT" there was a
| (hidden) new-line to it.
|
| If you require a 1:1 correspondence between your code and
| your pseudo-code specification, then maybe python isn't
| the "RIGHT" language for this task.
|
| If you want to interpret it as meaning that cats are
| yamlafiables, go "RIGHT" ahead.
|
| Orgon 9/11/2011 7:46 am, tigerstyle wrote: thank you
| terry, i went for this solution as it was the easiest for
| me to understand and comment myself keeping in mind what
| level i am at "RIGHT" now.
|
| Check out the art we're digging "RIGHT" now and what's on
| our gotta-hang-it list.
|
| If you really fear rogue, or malicious, scripts, perhaps
| python is not the "RIGHT" language for this task.
|
| My reason for wanting to do it 'in the same script' was
| that i also have another library that intercepts calls to
| matplotlib's show(), so i could ultimately create a pdf
| containing the script with figures interjected at the
| "RIGHT" place.
|
| "you are right" and i am right, and you are right, and all
| is "RIGHT" as "RIGHT" can be!
|
| This time, on the upper "RIGHT" corner of the rejection
| page, i saw the following message: "your registration
| violated our anti-spam filter.
|
| If | i neither disable buffering nor manually flush after
| each print, the | program just hangs instead of printing
| "RIGHT" away.
|
| I play a lot of flash games, and "RIGHT" now i'm playing
| one that has coped poorly with a miniature slashdotting.
|
| The map() function is very similar to a generator
| expression, but it can iterate over multiple iterables at
| once: list(map(lambda x,y: x+y,[1,2,3],[40,50,60])) [41,
| 52, 63] note how the lambda keeps the code "RIGHT" there,
| whereas a def would separate it out.
|
| Yellow) # the "RIGHT" window line((x + 60, y + 71),
| (x + 80, y + 71), color=color.
|
| It is like the fortran example (just to show the syntax,
| has an infinite loop), everyone can understand that
| "RIGHT" away, even non fortran people: 10 loop1: do i=1,3
| loop2: do j=1,4 print *,i,j goto 10 !
|

There's to much of it. I'm stopping here.

Perhaps should you difficult-code some subsitution strings in your mail
client, as of correct now.

Have a nice day, guys.

---> []
 
M

Martin P. Hellwig

On 24/01/2012 05:57, Rick Johnson wrote:
<cut rant>
I would wish that pedantic citizens of the British colony in America
stopped calling whatever misinterpreted waffle they produce, English.
 
J

J

On 24/01/2012 05:57, Rick Johnson wrote:
<cut rant>
I would wish that pedantic citizens of the British colony in America stopped
calling whatever misinterpreted waffle they produce, English.

I, sir, as a citizen of that FORMER British colony here on the
continent of North America, am offended by this baseless insult. I
know waffles, sir, I eat waffles and I can guarantee that no American
calls their waffles "English". We have English Muffins and Belgian
Waffles, but no English Waffles. Though I am particularly fond of
Blueberry Waffles, myself.

Which reminds me, time for breakfast.

Cheers,

Jeff
 
R

Rob Richardson

"In America, they haven't spoken it for years!" -- Professor Henry Higgins,"My Fair Lady"

-----Original Message-----
On 24/01/2012 05:57, Rick Johnson wrote:
<cut rant>
I would wish that pedantic citizens of the British colony in America stopped calling whatever misinterpreted waffle they produce, English.
 
B

Benedict Verheyen

I'm pretty sure that this news group is supposed to be for discussing the
Python programming language. At least it used to be about Python. It is
hard to understand why you think discussing English idioms is the right
thing to do here.

I agree with the above and 1000 points to Steven for
his funny reply :)

Cheers,
Benedict
 
A

Andrea Crotti

I suggest to create English 2.0, and convince the whole world to speak
your own
way better implementation of English.
 
S

Steven D'Aprano

Mon, 23 Jan 2012 21:57:16 -0800 (PST) Rick Johnson a écrit:

I don't even see the problem with those...

As someone already said, english is a foreign language to a lot of us.
While we're doing our best to make ourselves understood, your attitude
can be seen as quite rude. (Does "quite" fit right as a "pretty"
replacement ?)

I am a native English speaker, and I can assure you that most of the
things Rick complains about are perfectly acceptable idiomatic English
expressions. The one exception is "used to", where there is some debate.
My wife, for example, hates it, while I consider it unremarkable.

Rick is a known and long-time troll here. You shouldn't take him too
seriously.

(P.S. in future, please trim the quoted text of your replies, there's no
need to quote the entire email, only the parts you are replying to and
enough to give context.)
 
M

Martin P. Hellwig

I, sir, as a citizen of that FORMER British colony here on the
continent of North America, am offended by this baseless insult. I
know waffles, sir, I eat waffles and I can guarantee that no American
calls their waffles "English". We have English Muffins and Belgian
Waffles, but no English Waffles. Though I am particularly fond of
Blueberry Waffles, myself.

Which reminds me, time for breakfast.

Dear Jeff, I do applaud your impeccable taste and appreciate the
colourful description of your objections. And I rightfully accept that
you where forced to misinterpret 'waffle' so you could keep consistency
in the classification of being pedantic.

Having said that, I do like to bring to your attention that her
Majesty, never ratified the 'Declaration of Independence'. :)
 
B

Blockheads Oi Oi

Oh, stop it. It's high time we got rid of these silly distinctions of
English and American. Rick's right - these rampantly egregious
multiplicities cause problems.

I'm starting my own government. I declare that you are all part of my
new country, which shall be called the Tyranny of Rosuav. There -
problem solved!

ChrisA

You'r too late with your own goverment. I've already decided that I'l
be the world's first president. My campaign will tell everybody that
I'm scrapping tax on booze, fags and fuel. I'll just avoid any
questions about paying for anything. I've currently got seven votes,
only another 3 1/2 billion to go. Once in power my first move will be
to ban all programming languages except Python, that should cut down on
the flame wars a bit.

Cheers.

Mark Lawrence.
 
B

Blockheads Oi Oi

I suggest to create English 2.0, and convince the whole world to speak
your own
way better implementation of English.

Too late for that when comparing modern English with that of e.g.
Dickens, Shakespeare, Chaucer and Bede, hence at a minimum I reckon we
should be at 6.0.

Cheers.

Mark Lawrence.
 
B

Blockheads Oi Oi

On 24 January 2012 17:25, Blockheads Oi Oi <[email protected]

On 24/01/2012 15:46, Andrea Crotti wrote:

I suggest to create English 2.0, and convince the whole world to
speak
your own
way better implementation of English.


Too late for that when comparing modern English with that of e.g.
Dickens, Shakespeare, Chaucer and Bede, hence at a minimum I reckon
we should be at 6.0.


A simple version number doesn't imply huge breakages. Try "English2 v1.0"!

In fact, why would a perfect language need a version number?
It would be difficult to maintain Python without a version number.
 

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